Budget Friendly Ways to go Green

There’s no question that striving to live a more sustainable, environmentally conscious life benefits both the planet and our health. And though many people are afraid to start, afraid to change and step up from their comfortable and easy way of living that they are used to.

Maybe, they are afraid of the work and time that they have to put into it – but is it really that much?
Maybe, they fear the reaction of friends and family when they talk about there changes – but isn’t that a great way to spread awareness and make more people jump on the eco-train?
Maybe, they are afraid of the higher costs and extra expenses that come along with the change of lifestyle – but are those really necessary?

No! This post is here to shop you FREE or BUDGET FRIENDLY tips & tricks for a more eco friendly and green way of living, so get your pens and notebooks out and start cooperating these into your daily live to save our beautiful planet.

And some tips actually save you money! How awesome is that?!

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Credit.com created a detailed guide that goes over budget friendly ways to go green, from shopping to pet care to household and technological improvements and it gave me the inspiration to talk about a few things on here with you.

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Sustainable Eating

Plant Based

You want to know why a plant based diet is the most eco friendly diets and one of the biggest changes you can make to save our planet?

I could talk hours about this topic and tell you hundreds of reasons, but here are a few very important ones:

Our earth is majorly influenced by animal agriculture through

  • greenhouse gas emission (one of the big reasons for climate change!)
  • destroying of natural habitats through deforestation and the animal extinction going along
  • ocean dead zones caused by global warming (climate change!) or leaking of animal excretes into rivers and oceans
  • wasting water and grains (and the agricultural land that is needed to produce it) to produce meat and dairy (1kg beef needs 15000 litres of water and 16kg grains, 1kg cheese needs 5000 litres of water)

And there are many more reasons to cut out meat, dairy and eggs for your health, the animals and our planet! Watch this video to find out more.

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@designsbyariana

So please, EAT MORE PLANTS and save our future (and your health & the animals). It is not as hard as you might think and you don’t need to do it 100% right away. You never have to, it’s about steps into the right direction. Meat only once a week, only on special occasions, only with friends and family.

Read more into it, learn more and if you actually WANT to eat fewer animal products and more vegan it will get easier because you have a good motivation behind it.

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You think eating vegan is hard? Complicated, expensive and boring? Look at these simple, quick, healthy and budget-friendly Dinner recipes!

You think cake, muffins and all the sweet things in life need eggs, milk and butter? I prove you wrong with these mouthwatering vegan sweets and treats (that are pretty healthy too!).

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Shop Local & Seasonal

I know it can be hard when you live in a colder climate and don’t want to only eat apples, potatoes and beets.

But try to be more reasonable: Fresh berries in winter? That’s not necessary when you can eat them in abundance locally in summer. Mangoes? Have them only as a treat when they are in season from the country you purchase them from.

And we also often forget that rice, sweet potato, bananas, nuts and more – staples in most diets aren’t local as well and have long distances until they end up in our supermarkets.

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@aniahimsa

You don’t need to cut out on imported products completely (that’s often not even possible in some countries), but eat more of what you can shop local and that is in season and have tropical fruits and exotic products as treats.

Shopping on markets makes it also much easier. Find stalls that sell from local farmers and you will support your region and the seasonal products they are harvesting in that time of the year.

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Less Plastic

I don’t really need to explain why this is important to save our earth from plastic waste. But my blog post ‚We drown in Plastic‚ gives you some more information on it.

  • choose plastic free produce over wrapped ones and use cotton bags
  • reusable shopping bags
  • fresh produce over ready-made meals
  • bulk food sections and stores to refill your reusable containers with rice, grains, beans, pasta…

Melbourne Travel Guide

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@mari.linni

Make it Yourself

Many products we buy contain so many chemicals, unnecessary ingredients and are much better ‚do it yourself‘ for your health and body as well as for the health or our earth, the soil and the environment.

  • Cleaning supplies: contain heavy chemicals and sents, better make them from vinegar, lemon essential oils (here you can find simple and natural recipes for cleaners)
  • Beauty products: no need for fancy body lotion, deodorant, shower gel, hair and face masks… it’s actually possible to recreate these products very naturally. I want to get more into that as well and show you easy DIY’s but until then, have a look at these recipes. And if you are too lazy to make them yourself, buy soap bars and package free beauty like I use
  • Food: soak and cook beans, lentils and chickpeas yourself avoid the nasties of cans and the energy that goes into producing them, make plant-based milk yourself and store in reusable glass bottles (recipes here), hummus, bread, vegan yogurt, falafel… can all be made yourself pretty easily
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@ellenfisher
  • Grow your own food: it’s not just fun and exciting to harvest your own products and care for your plants to provide you with yummy crops, but it also saves energy and water because you can be more conscious than most big food producers, you can harvest just what you need for one meal so nothing can go bad and you will become more aware of things that are in season. And don’t argue with not having a garden, you can grow herbs, salads, carrots, strawberries, tomatoes and more on a balcony!
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@aniahimsa

Less Waste

  • only buy what you need and can actually eat, that lasts long or can be frozen for later
  • go through your fridge, pantry and freezer regularly and make sure that your food doesn’t go off – eat it in time
  • try avoiding printing and have as much as you can on your laptop and phone
  • Opt out of junk mail. You don’t read it anyways and if you do, it’s not just a waste of trees but also of your time
  • Buy less. It will save your money, time (because you work for the money that it costs) and you don’t really need it anyway. Every product needs so much water and energy to produce only for you to wear it once? Use it for a week and then realize its garbage?
  • Buy quality. Rather spend a little more on something proper that lasts you forever instead of buying new every two years.
  • Compost food scraps in your garden.
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Second Hand shopping in Sydney

Recycle, Repair, Reuse

  • Recycle everything you can correctly
  • Repair instead of buying new
  • Reuse. Give things new lives by giving them makeovers or giving them away to people that actually need, use and want them
  • Buy second hand to reuse and not support the production of new products

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Share

  • take public transport to cut CO2 emission
  • share a car with your partner and family or use share cars in the city
  • borrow books, clothes or things you only need occasionally from friends, neighbours or family

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Technology

The key is to use less energy and be efficient. Don’t use them if not necessary.

  • only use dishwasher, washing machine and dryer when they are full
  • avoid using the dryer and air dry your clothes
  • use eco programmes if available
  • unplug devices if they are not in use
  • overthink the necessity of your technology (do you need all those extra special kitchen devices/ several TV’s in your household?)
  • print double-sided (if at all)
  • don’t leave your charger plugged in (even if your phone is unplugged, it still uses energy)
  • recycle old technology like batteries, phones, radios…

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This ended up to be a pretty long post as I wanted to squeeze as much information and tips in as possible. I hope you could learn something new or got reminded on a few things to change in your own daily life!

Do you have more tips? What is important to you when saving the planet?

Werbeanzeigen

Eating out Vegan in Melbourne // What I Eat #2

In my first What I Eat in a day from Melbourne, I showed you a lot of very cheap, quick and easy meals I made in my first few days in Melbourne.

I really want to stay healthy, fit, mostly plant-based and eat on a budget while I travel, but I also want to try the amazing vegan food spots, enjoy my time and go out with friends.

That’s why you will find some restaurant recommendations for Melbourne in this post, as I went out for food quite a few times with my friends – and it was worth it!

Now I try to still keep on track with my money, but also enjoy the amazing (vegan) food they have here without any regrets!

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Saturday 29/9

On Saturday I had to leave my first hostel and move to Sabrina’s hostel in Fitzroy, so I enjoyed the free pancakes for the last time for breakfast.

I really wish they would not have them in most hostels for breakfast for free, because they aren’t vegan and pretty unhealthy but free – so it’s hard to resist :D

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For lunch, I had some leftover pasta with my go-to sauce at the moment that I keep repeating. You can find the recipe in my last What I Eat post!

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IMG_6176 After watching the Football game in a pub, I was super stoked for some unhealthy burger (as many people ate them in the pub) and so we went to ‚Lord of the Fries‘ an all vegan fast-food burger chain. It tasted unhealthy, but awesome at the same time! I had a ‚fish-burger‘ and sweet potato fries with vegan aioli and only spend 20$ for that.


Sunday 30/10

For breakfast, I met again with my AuPair mom in a wonderful, small and calm café called ’slowpoke‘ on Brunswick Street.

This time I ordered buckwheat chocolate granola with coconut yogurt, almond milk and pears which was super delicious and very filling. Luckily, I didn’t got the Avo Toast this time, as it could have never topped the one I had two days ago with her!

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As a snack, I had some bread with hummus as well as carrots to dip.

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Sadly, I forgot to take a picture from our actual dinner.

We had an oven roast with sweet potato, broccoli and capsicum with tomato chutney.

As a dessert, we got these funny Asian rice balls with peanut butter from the Asian supermarket.

They taste weird but okay and it was cool to try them.

 

 

 

More Meals…

As I had pretty much the same for breakfast most days / it didn’t look that great / I just forgot to take pictures I will only show you a few more meals I had in Melbourne.

My breakfast was either free pancakes with maple syrup, rice-porridge (that I showed you in part one) or toast and chocolate spread/strawberry jam at the free breakfast in my 2nd hostel.

Sadly it wasn’t as healthy as I imagined it, but it’s hard to decide between being cheap or healthy…

 

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My last week in Melbourne was a little less tourist-y and more enjoying time with the friends I met. We went to the market to go food shopping and had a late breakfast / early brunch there. I bought a falafel wrap for 4$ (2,50€) at the food court which was very good as well as another slice of banana bread.

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Even though the banana bread from Aldi is packed individually in plastic which sucks, it is so practical to take with you and not eat everything at once. And it also keeps it moist and yummy!

And if you wonder: yes! They have Aldi here :D

 

 

 

 

 

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The day we went to Brighton Beach, I had olive ciabatta with olive hummus for lunch in the sunshine and the same for dinner with another slice of banana bread.

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Another day Sabrina and me slept in and then made this amazing vegan pasta bolognese for lunch. Super easy, quick and delicious!

Quick Vegan Pasta Bolognese

You need: pasta, carrots, onion, tofu, tomato sauce, salt, some spices and a little bit of oil and soy sauce

How to: Boil pasta with salt. Fry chopped onion with a little bit of oil in a pan. Add chopped carrots and a bit of water and steam for a while. Mash firm tofu with a fork and sprinkle with soy sauce, add into the pan. Spice with salt, pepper, veggie broth, Italian herbs (whatever you have/like). Add tomato sauce and the cooked pasta.

If you like you can add cheese or nutritional yeast as well as fresh spinach & tomatoes to make it even more nutritious.

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The next night we ate some leftover tofu fried with onion, capsicum and carrots in a wrap with hummus, tomato chutney and lots of spinach. I really like wraps and eat them a lot here because they are healthy, easy, variable and delicious!

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Soy, mushroom and tomato noodles with fried tofu, broccoli, salad and fried onion.

One night we went to ‚Lentils as Anything‘ and it was a feast! We tried all the dished they had that evening and everything was just AWESOME! I am for sure going there in Sydney as well. Oh and everything is VEGAN by the way!

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Savoury Japanese pancake with tomato relish, vegan aioli, firm tofu and nori. Extremely delicious and something I never ate before.
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Veggie Ratatouille with mashed potato, salad and nutritional yeast. My favourite dish!

Cauliflower and something soup and dried fruit chocolate brownie for dessert.

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You can see that I couldn’t really resist eating out on my second week in Melbourne :D That’s just how it is when you meet people and want to enjoy your time with them and for me, that’s totally okay! I rather sleep in a 12-bed-dorm and live cheap as much as I can, but spend a little bit more on dining out with friends and having a wonderful time! Especially when it’s healthy and vegan food!

At ‚Madam Saigon‘ I had this amazing vegan noodle salad bowl for only 11$ (7€) which is amazingly cheap for eating out here!

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My second hostel had a free soup night every Tuesday, so I had vegan carrot soup with bread and some more fresh carrots with hummus for dinner that night.


That’s more or less everything I ate in Melbourne! Besides my Breakfast mostly healthy and besides eating out mostly cheap :D

How do you like my Backpacking What I Eat in a Day’s? Is it interesting? What would you like to see and hear more of?